Archives for June 2016

Celtic Faire 2016 weathers Stormageddon to open our doors to all

Bagpipes, stunning organ music, beautiful Celtic hymns and the Kirking of the Tartans marked our celebration of the Feast of St. Andrew on Sunday October 16.

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singlepiper-copyDespite dire storm predictions on Saturday, some 250 members of the surrounding community visited our Celtic village with its Bake Shoppe, Tea Room, and marketplace.bakeshoppe_med

They enjoyed High Tea and searched Second Time Around for jewelry bargains. Although some of our entertainers could not make it because of the storm, visitors were treated to a fascinating seminar on genealogy, as well as singers, bagpipers, and weavers.

oldmenAlmost thirty parishioners and visitors gathered in the Ada Webb Room on Sunday afternoon to be take part in an interactive seminar by Christine Sine, who shared pictures, hymns, prayers, and songs that are a part of the traditions of Celtic Christianity. You can find out more about Christine Sine and Mustard Seed Associates at the Godspace web site.

The weekend concluded with a  lamb dinner with all the trimmings by Chefs Ken and Pam Rhodes and their associates, served by the St. Andrew’s Youth Team.

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We were privileged to witness the formal presentation of the Haggis, carried by Riley Girard, accompanied by John Vance’s bagpipes, followed by Tom Egnew’s unforgettable recitation of Robert Burns’ “Ode to the Haggis.”

The evening concluded with the Celtic quilt raffle, and a silent and live auction.

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Thanks to all of the members and friends of St. Andrew’s who put in so many hours preparing for the Faire, with special thanks to Liz Herriges, our fearless leader, and Norbert Herriges, chief assembler and tartan hanger, and all of their team leaders and team members.

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All in all, more than 70 people from St. Andrew’s were involved in our Faire.

 

Ordinary Creating the Extraordinary

This month’s Vestry Viewpoint is an inspiring message from our Senior Warden, Terry Bonet:

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Two of my favorite things are history and architecture. Any time the two are combined, I become giddy, so you can imagine how much my trip to Europe meant. Not only was I getting to see my oldest daughter for the first time in over a year, but I was going to be immersed in enough history and old world architecture to keep myself occupied for months.

One of the things that struck me in all the old cathedrals was that ordinary men had built them. During the time they were built (in one case, construction was started in 597 AD) most of the workers couldn’t read or write. There were no large pieces of machinery to lift the stones and no factory to cut them; no concrete mixers or walkie-talkies for efficient communication. In some cases, they weren’t paid because members of the clergy told them it would absolve their sins to build a church. The men worked mostly with small tools yet they created something that millions of people over time have visited, enjoyed, and worshipped within. When you examine the details in the smooth stone and the beautiful carvings, you can see what an ordinary human can make. Visitors can physically see the extraordinary gifts God gave us all.

The Bible has many examples of God working in the ordinary:

1. In the case of Nehemiah, we see a man who was nothing more than a slave who served wine to a king. Yet, because of his great faith, in an ordinary day, God ordained him to be part of a historic event to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem.

2. In Genesis, Jacob is a man who used deception to take the blessing of being the first born. Despite his poor choices, God still used him to produce 12 sons, who would one day be the patriarchs of the 12 tribes of Israel.

These are just two examples but there are many more. We go through life not fully realizing what we are capable of. Sometimes, this stems from fear or lack of encouragement but there are times when we look back in amazement because we have accomplished something we never thought was possible. I come from parents who never finished tenth grade. I was the only one to walk in a high school graduation out of five children, and the only one to earn a college degree. I was told “no” my entire life. Told I couldn’t make it or accomplish what I wanted, but I look back and see what I have earned through dedication and hard work and it brings tears to my eyes. I have no idea how I got here. Well, I do know; I know God has been building a cathedral in me.
The tour through Europe made me see just how extraordinary God has made hu- man beings. The art, the sculptures, the literature, and the buildings. It made me ask myself, what is the cathedral I’m building one stone at a time? How am I asking God to work in my life to help make the ordinary things extraordinary? When your life is filled with the desire to see the holiness in everyday life, something magical happens.

“Ordinary life becomes extraordinary,
and the very process of life begins to nourish your soul.”
-Rabbi Harold Kushner

Children and their families to get a personal introduction to the Fritts organ

On Friday, July 8, at 6:00 PM, St. Andrew’s will host our first Midsommernight’s Organ Party, a “come as you are” participatory demonstration concert for kids of all ages. Children are encouraged to bring their parents and/or grandparents to hear and experience the many different kinds of sound and music made on the organ in a program presented by artist-in-residence, Jonathan Wohlers.

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Vacation Bible School takes kids to ancient Egypt

St. Andrews’ 2016 VBS took our children and youth to ancient Egypt, where they relived the experiences of Joseph and his brothers through storytelling, crafting, and music. They loved Joseph’s story of hope, perseverance, and forgiveness!

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Thanks to Matthew Moravec and our amazing team of adult and youth volunteers for all of their hard work in making this happen! Thanks to all of the families who donated tents and props to make the setting come to life!

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