Still time to experience Jean Tudor art exhibit, “A Song of Creation”

A Song of Creation, a Biblical canticle in Anglican and Roman Catholic liturgy depicting glory of Creation, has been depicted by artist Jean Tudor in enamel on copper as 17 dramatically colored plaques. This stunning work is on display at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church through March (during Lent). It is in the Church by the Baptismal Font.  (Jean Tudor is the creator of our new Celtic Cross in the parish Columbarium.)

Jean Tudor’s calling is as an enamellist working with glass, metal and a kiln. She has taught workshops here and abroad and her work has been included in exhibitions in the USA, Germany, Spain, Chile, Japan, Mexico and France. Jean teaches workshops at home and at the Tacoma Metal Arts Center, and regularly teaches enameling in the Summer and the October programs at the Grünewald Guild, an art/faith center in the Cascade Mountains where she has been named a Guild Master. She is married to a retired Episcopalian minister whose work has led them to live on the West coast, the East coast, the Midwest, and in Colombia. Jean is now back “home” in Western Washington.

About this installation, the artist writes: “The Benedicite, Omnia Opera Domini depicts aspects of this song of praise which is included in The Prayerbook of the Episcopal Church within the Morning Prayer service. The Song of the Three Young Men sung by Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego while in the fiery furnace contains such beautiful imagery. In a way it parallels the Genesis creation story. But this is Creation up and running, and the song invites all of God’s Creation to bless God and magnify God forever. It sweeps through the galaxies with its changing imagery provided by Hubble photos. It tells of the variety of weather, and the rhythm of darkness and light as portrayed by Mercator maps with lines that move as the new day dawns. The song brings to mind Creation that always continues, with all sorts and conditions of humans helping in their small ways with the making of their tools and artifacts, and their creative ideas. And it calls on all, past and present, to praise and magnify the Lord. What a magnificent invitation!”

The song of Creation may be found in our Book of Common Prayer as Canticles 1 and 12 (pages 47 & 88).